Those who appreciate the responsibility and privilege they have been given by God should be prepared to embark on the path of responsibility for the world we live in and pledge accountability for its welfare to look after, protect and improve the quality of life for everyone.

Sheikh Zayed Bin Sultan Al Nahyan

The late president and founding father of
the United Arab Emirates
1918 – 2004

Zayed
Future Energy Prize

Named after the founding father of the United Arab Emirates, Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan al Nahyan, the Zayed Future Energy Prize was established in 2008 to recognize and reward those whose innovations help achieve the changes needed to secure a sustainable future for theplanet and improve the quality of life of its inhabitants.

Through the prize winners, 887 million tonnes of CO2 have been saved, 360 million MWh have been produced through renewable energy, 65 million MWh saved through greater efficiency and 98 million kWh generated by solar lanterns. In 2009 there were 204 nominations from 50 countries.

Those figures have grown to 1,437 nominations and submissions from 97 countries for the 8th edition of the prize. Over 200,000,000 people worldwide have seen tangible improvements in their lives because of the prize winners – through greater access to safe and renewable energy, cleaner drinking water, and increased energy efficient.

Communicating innovation

The Zayed Future Energy Prize, which promotes innovation in cutting-edge technology in the field of clean energy and sustainability, also has a range of state-of-the-art communication platforms to ensure that the prize’s global community can share ideas, consider solutions and keep abreast of the latest developments as they happen.

Launched in August 2014, Sustainnovate already has 85,000 users worldwide. These users are drawn from large corporations, small and medium enterprises, NPOs, academics, entrepreneurs and innovators. It includes sections on industry news and case studies as well as having a discussion board and blogs. Sustainnovate also has a stablemate dedicated to younger people – Ysustainnovate, which addresses global high schools and provides learning tools such as video and audio material and an “Ask the Expert” feature.

In addition, 93,500 Facebook users “like” the Zayed Future Energy Prize page and there are 184,000 regular followers on Twitter.

Meeting today’s challenges
for a better tomorrow

Inspired by the vision of Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, the Zayed Future Energy Prize seeks to empower and connect companies, organisations, schools and individuals across the world who are innovative pioneers in the field of renewable energy and sustainability. The prize strives to give a voice to those that have also committed themselves to addressing environmental, economic and social challenges posed by climate change. Over the years remarkable people connected to the prize have devised innovative ways of reducing damage done to the environment and human health, while still fostering economic growth, improving energy security and access to basic services.

The prize provides a platform for information exchange and knowledge growth. From those with the spark of innovation right through to those young people who have the initiative to learn something new – the Zayed Future Energy Prize continues to forge a path to ensure a sustainable future for everyone across the globe.

SECURE ENERGY FOR A CLEAN ENVIRONMENT

Previous winners include Toyota, the world’s largest car manufacturing company, which launched its Prius hybrid vehicle in 1997 and Vestas, the world leader in wind turbine technology, striving to establish wind as a reliable and viable alternative to fossil fuels. In total, large corporations have succeeded in reducing CO2 emissions by over 800 million tonnes.

A bright future

Far too many students across the developing world face a difficult choice; neglect their health or neglect their studies because the only light they had was a dangerous and unhealthy kerosene lamp. Now ten million children have access to clean solar-powered light thanks to robust and sustainable innovations implemented by the prize-winning Small and Medium Enterprises. This is just one way that SME innovators are helping to improve the lives of others across the world.

DOING THE GROUND WORK

A show of hands in the boardroom can determine where millions of dollars are spent, but the cumulative effect of millions of individual decisions should not be underestimated, nor should the efforts of non-profit organisations (NPOs) and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) working on the ground, exercising their influence over governments, companies and the general public. These organisations demonstrate their commitment to a sustainable future by helping to provide improved standards of living and quality of life, secure livelihoods, access to education and long-term independence through community-based facilities that give them the tools to create their own sustainability journey.

The game changers

Those considered for the lifetime achievement award are remarkable individuals. Past winners have made a lasting impression on the planet and positively affected the lives of millions of people worldwide through their long-term vision and leadership in this field. To date, winners have included academics, scientists, business people and politicians – whose influence is set to last long into the future.

THE NEXT GENERATION OF ENERGY INNOVATORS

Since the launch of the Global High Schools category in 2012, as part of the UAEs leadership's commitment to the Sustainable Energy for All (SE4All) initiative, nearly 2,000 students have been directly involved in the projects of award-winning schools and academies. Consequently over 9,000 students in total have benefitted from these projects, as well as 37,000 people living in local communities. Almost 1.5 million kWh have been generated, solar panels with a capacity of 263 kW installed and CO2 emission cut by over 1,000 tonnes.

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Large corporation
2010 winner
Toyota
Japan
Toyota Motor Corporation has made numerous improvements to hybrid technology. The third generation Prius, for which Toyota ultimately won the Zayed Future Energy Prize, is the first mass-produced hybrid vehicle ever made. The car boasts ground-breaking fuel economy, Toyota's innovative hybrid drive technology and improved aerodynamics.
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Large corporation
2011 winner
Vestas
Denmark
For over 30 years, Vestas, a global market leader in providing wind power plants, has been introducing innovative ideas to promote clean, renewable wind power as one of the world's mainstream power solutions.
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Large corporation
2012 winner
Schneider Electric
France
As the global specialist in energy management, Schneider Electric’s sustainability approach relies on employee engagement, the company’s Planet & Society Barometer, and having the firm’s commitments recognised, especially through inclusion on the world’s ethical stock indices.
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Large corporation
2013 winner
Siemens
Germany
Siemens’ history in the Middle East dates back to 1856, when Werner von Siemens first travelled to the region to supervise the laying of the undersea cables for the London-Calcutta telegraphic line. Since then, Siemens has been at the forefront of the region’s infrastructure.
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Large corporation
2014 winner
ABB
Switzerland
ABB is a global supplier of power and automation technologies with 120 years of experience in the energy sector. The company has operations in 100 countries generating US$39.3 billion in revenue (2012), with US$22 billion coming from divisions related to renewable energy and energy efficiency.
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Large corporation
2015 winner
Panasonic
Japan
Panasonic Corporation, one of the largest electronics manufacturers in the world, offers hundreds of products geared toward reducing energy and facilitating the use of renewables.
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Small and Medium Enterprises
2010 runner-up
Intl. Development Enterprises
India
International Development Enterprises India (IDEI) is a social enterprise dedicated to providing long-term solutions to poverty, malnutrition, and hunger. They work with smallholder farmers to provide low-cost irrigation technologies that drastically improve crop yields and the livelihoods of these local farmers.
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Small and Medium Enterprises
2011 runner-up
E+Co
USA
E+Co supports and invests in small and growing clean energy enterprises in developing countries to impact climate change and energy poverty. With E+Co support, entrepreneurs have brought clean energy to more than 6.2 million people, created over 5,000 jobs, and offset 4.6 million tons of carbon.
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Small and Medium Enterprises
2012 winner
CDP
UK
A 2012 winner of the Zayed Future Energy Prize, CDP’s mission is to transform the global economic system. It works to prevent dangerous climate change and value our natural resources.
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Small and Medium Enterprises
2013 winner
d.light design
USA
d.light manufactures and distributes solar lighting and power products targeting the 2.6 billion people globally without access to reliable electricity.
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Small and Medium Enterprises
2014 winner
Abellon CleanEnergy
India
Abellon CleanEnergy was rewarded for its advances in biomass pellets – made from agricultural and saw mill residues that are helping meet global energy and heat demands. The company is also instrumental in driving economic growth in the Indian state of Gujarat by supporting rural farmers to dramatically improve their crop yields.
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Small and Medium Enterprises
2015 winner
M-KOPA Solar
Kenya
M-KOPA Solar is the market leader in 'pay-as-you-go' energy services for off-grid customers. In less than two years, M-KOPA Solar has connected more than 100,000 homes in East Africa to solar power and is adding over 10,000 new ones each month.
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winner
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NPO/NGO
2012 runner-up
Environmental Defense Fund
USA
The Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) has pioneered market-based tools to solve environmental problems.
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NPO/NGO
2013 winner
Ceres
USA
Ceres is an independent, non-profit advocacy organisation that mobilises investor and business leadership to build a low-carbon, clean energy global economy. In 1997, Ceres launched the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), now the international standard for corporate sustainability reporting.
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NPO/NGO
2014 winner
Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems
Germany
Fraunhofer is Europe’s largest solar energy research institute, and one of the largest in the world. It was founded in 1981 on the belief that renewable energies, especially solar energy, are indispensable to an economically just and sustainable future.
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NPO/NGO
2015 winner
Liter of Light
Philippines
Liter of Light is a day and night solution that provides passive daylight and charged evening solar lights such as lanterns, house lights, and streetlights. It's powerful enough to light up a home but more than that it's environmentally friendly, inexpensive, and easy to make.
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Lifetime achievement
2015 winner
Al Gore
USA
AI Gore was US Vice President for two terms under President Bill Clinton (1993 to 2001). He has been a lifelong campaigner on environmental issues and has arguably done more than anyone to drag climate change up the political agenda in the US- and possibly the world.
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Lifetime achievement
2014 winner
Mr. Wang Chuanfu
China
Wang Chuanfu is the founder and chairman of BYD Co Ltd, the Chinese auto and battery maker. Wang founded BYD at 29 and today the company is worth US$11.2 billion.
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Lifetime achievement
2013 winner
Professor Jose Goldemberg
Brazil
Dr. Goldemberg has served as the President of Brazilian Association for the Advancement of Science. He was also former Minister of State for Education of Brazil and Secretary for the Environment of the State of São Paulo.
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Lifetime achievement
2012 winner
Dr. Ashok Gadgil
USA
Dr. Ashok Gadgil’s life and work exemplify sustainable invention. Among the solutions he has pioneered is UV Waterworks and the Berkeley-Darfur stove.
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Lifetime achievement
2011 runner-up
Amory B. Lovins
USA
Amory B. Lovins, Chairman and Chief Scientist of Rocky Mountain Institute in Colorado, is known for his work on "integrative design" for energy efficient buildings, vehicles, and factories. Lovins describes "integrative design" as a powerful and globally applicable new tool for shifting rapidly from oil and coal to efficiency and renewable.
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Lifetime achievement
2009 winner
Dipal Barua
Bangladesh
For over 35 years, Mr. Barua has been dedicated to finding and developing sustainable, market-based solutions to the social and economic problems faced by rural people. Mr. Barua won the Prize for his work as the Founding Managing Director of Grameen Shakti, a clean energy company that brought electricity to more than 2.2 million people in Bangladesh.
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Lifetime achievement
2009 runner-up
Dr. Martin Green
Australia
Dr. Green has made significant contributions to the field of photovoltaics. His work began with identifying the factors that limited silicon solar cell performance. These advances were put into commercial production with a large proportion of solar cells that are manufactured in Europe. Dr. Green's work has helped to drastically increase the economic viability of solar energy by decreasing the cost of solar to less then US$0.50 per watt.
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2016 winner
Africa
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2016 winner
Americas
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2016 winner
Asia
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2016 winner
Europe
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2016 winner
Oceania
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Global High Schools - Africa
2013 winner
Kirya Secondary School
Tanzania
Kirya shares a green network with sister schools, Makomu and Kileo. Now the schools model renewable energy options to raise awareness and reduce ecological footprints.
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Global High Schools - Africa
2014 winner
Nkhata Bay School Authority
Malawi
The Nkhata Bay School Authority was rewarded for its proposal to create a Solar Demonstration and Training Center – a program that will promote the use of solar power in one of the least electrified countries in Southern Africa.
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Global High Schools - Africa
2015 winner
Waterford Kamhlaba
Swaziland
Founded in 1963, with just 16 students, Southern Africa's first multiracial school has successfully demonstrated that students thrive and excel in a non-racial environment, educated side by side on equal terms. Courage, leadership, equality, and academic excellence remain at its core.
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Global High Schools - Americas
2013 winner
Secundaria Tecnica 120
Mexico
Technical High school 120 helps promote community participation in the reduction of the school environmental footprint.
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Global High Schools - Americas
2014 winner
Bronx Design & Construction Academy
USA
New York-based Bronx Design & Construction Academy was selected for its Energy Environment Research Center – an initiative to generate on-site renewable energy from wind and solar power.
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Global High Schools - Americas
2015 winner
Munro Academy
Canada
Munro Academy provides life changing education for Pre-Primary to Grade 12 students. A member of Nova Scotia's Green Schools, Munro Academy has sought to engage students in environmentally sustainable alternatives in renovating a 12,000 square foot school building.
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Global High Schools - Asia
2013 winner
Shaikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Bangladesh Islamia School
UAE
Shaikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Bangladesh Islamia School, Abu Dhabi, actively participates in the Sustainable Schools Initiative and other environmental programmes.
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Global High Schools - Asia
2014 winner
Kalkeri Sangeet Vidyalaya
India
Kalkeri Sangeet Vidyalaya was selected for its student-led project to incorporate energy efficiency, solar technology and bio-gas, as well as other energy programs, to electrify the homes of deserving, underprivileged students.
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Global High Schools - Asia
2015 winner
Addu High School
Maldives
Addu High School was inaugurated as a high school in 2010 to address the urgent need for higher scondary education in Addu City. The school strives to be a community of caring learners who use their intellectual capacity to its fullest. It continues to educate and produce future leaders of Maldives.
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Global High Schools - Europe
2013 winner
Okehampton College
UK
Okehampton College is a comprehensive school with pupils drawn from one of the largest UK catchment areas. Okehampton places great emphasis on sustainability.
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Global High Schools - Europe
2014 winner
Gheoghe Rosca Codreanu National College
Romania
The school was selected for its proposal to reduce the school’s electricity demand by 100 percent using LED lighting and solar panels, and to conduct sustainability seminars for the local community.
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Global High Schools - Europe
2015 winner
Petru Rares National College
Romania
Founded in 1869, the school focuses on theoretical studies in both sciences and humanities. It boasts a remarkable number of national and international participants in various School Olympiads ranging from mathematics and astrophysics to social sciences and foreign languages.
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Global High Schools - Oceania
2014 winner
Tonga High School
Tonga
The Tonga High School was selected for their project to install solar panels and energy-efficiency measures that will power up to 100 percent of the school’s electricity requirements.
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Global High Schools - Oceania
2015 winner
Melbourne Girls' College
Australia
Melbourne Girls' College was established in 1994 with the aim of providing an exemplary environment for the education of girls. The college is known for academic excellence, commitment to sustainability, and for providing a safe, positive, and creative place of learning.
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Large corporation

BYD

BYD is one of the world’s leading manufacturers of clean energy vehicles. London, New York, Hong Kong, Singapore, Brussels, and Bogota are just six of the cities in 36 countries worldwide benefitting from BYD’s electrified public transport solutions, which go some way towards fulfilling the company’s dream of achieving zero emission energy systems.

BYD’s team of 16,000 R&D engineers have come up with innovations that have helped changed perceptions of new energy vehicles. This includes the development of the BYD PHEV Qin which combines high performance (0-100kmh in 5.9 seconds) with fuel efficiency (100km on less than two litres of petrol)

In 2015, the company invested around US$3 billion in iron-phosphate batteries and new energy vehicle R&D, and subsidised new energy vehicles for its employees to promote their widespread use.

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Small and medium enterprise

OFF GRID ELECTRIC

- Tanzania

Offering easier access to energy to help increase study time, income generation and leisure pursuits, Off Grid Electric provides solar power services to customers in Tanzania who are not connected to the conventional power network.

Off Grid Electric’s customers can upgrade their systems without having to buy a new product and offer a 10-year leasing agreement with free servicing. The company’s ‘Million Solar Homes’ initiative aims to expand the access to off-grid solar power to even more people in Tanzania.

The benefits of clean solar power are already being felt by 225,000 people in 45,000 households across the country. Off Grid Electric’s solar home systems mean householders no longer need to use more expensive and polluting kerosene, diesel or charcoal, making the home environment healthier, protecting the environment with reduced carbon emissions and saving a typical consumer as much as $15 a month.

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NPO/NGO

Kopernik

- Indonesia

Kopernik delivers sustainable energy technologies to communities thereby helping to reduce poverty. By November 2015, the organization had distributed over 60,000 units of clean energy technologies including solar lights, water filters, and cooking stoves, reaching over 300,000 people. Kopernik also runs the “Wonder Woman” initiative, helping women to become entrepreneurs through the sale of clean energy products in the communities.

Over the years, Kopernik has learned how to promote clean energy products to “base of the pyramid” markets. They identify building trust, overcoming financial barriers, riding the “adoption wave” (recognizing that not everyone embraces innovations straightaway), focusing on tangible benefits and showing commitment by staying engaged, as the key drivers of this approach.

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Lifetime achievement

DR GRO HARLEM BRUNDTLAND

- Norway

Dr Gro Harlem Brundtland became Norway’s first female prime minister in 1981, a position she held for a total of a decade over three terms. She was the youngest ever person to be elected to the position of prime minister. Before entering political service, she qualified as a medical doctor and worked in the public school health service in Oslo.

After leaving Norwegian politics in 1996 she went on to chair the UN’s World Commission on Environment and Development which produced a report, “Our Common Future”. It is testimony to her considerable influence that these are known in common parlance simply as the Brundtland Commission and the Brundtland Report. Noted for its unprecedented inclusiv eness, the impact of the report, which recognized that economic development, social progress and environmental protection went hand-in-hand, is felt today as it led directly to the 1992 Earth Summit and the Rio Declaration.

Appointed Director General of the World Health Organization in 1998, the UN Special Envoy on Climate Change in 2007 and a member of the UN Secretary- General’s High-Level Panel on Global Sustainability in 2010, Ms Brundtland now serves as deputy chair of the Elders, a group established by Nelson Mandela and made up of former world leaders who dedicate themselves to addressing the most pressing global problems of the time.

On sustainable development, she said “These [goals] should address the economic, social and environmental dimensions of development in a comprehensive manner that can galvanise efforts to grow economies in a way that tackles poverty and inequality and protects our environment."

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GLOBAL HIGH SCHOOL - AFRICA

SOS HG SHEIKH SECONDARY SCHOOL

- Somalia

Boasting the President, the Speaker of the Parliament and a PhD candidate who studied renewable energy among its alumni, the SOS HG Sheikh Secondary School is well placed to meet the challenges of promoting sustainability. These challenges include lack of awareness of the importance of modifying behaviour, an inadequate policy framework and low technical capacity.

Their project will help 293 families move away from using charcoal for cooking by giving them access to the school’s excess gas that is 70% cheaper than the normal price. This will save 152, 027 trees, reduce indoor pollution and increase energy savings by US$935,225 over the duration of the project. Academic performance will also improve. The school will use clean power allowing students to read for 21⁄2 hours a day rather than the average 1 hour at present with expensive and inefficient kerosene lamps.

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GLOBAL HIGH SCHOOL - ASIA

Korea Science Academy

- South Korea

Established in 1991 as a science high school, KSA in Busan was designated as an institute for gifted education by the Korean Government in 2003 and has been affiliated with KAIST, a world-class science and technology university since 2009. South-east of Korea has 16 operating nuclear reactors providing 30 per cent of the country’s energy needs (compared with just 2 per cent from renewables) but opposition to atomic power has grown since the Fukushima disaster in 2011.

Working with KOSPO (Korea Southern Power), KSA has organized the Green Energy Dream Camp giving local children a high quality education programme. In August 2015 KSA hosted the international Korea Science Academy Science Fair focusing on the theme “Environment and Energy” which attracted 150 students from 29 institutes spanning 15 countries.

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GLOBAL HIGH SCHOOL - AMERICAS

INSTITUCIÓN EDUCATIVA GABRIEL PLAZAS

- Colombia

Located in rural Colombia, Institución Educativa Gabriel Plazas strives to securing access to more reliable, less expensive and more sustainable sources of energy. The school is therefore proposing to build a self- sustaining cafeteria to be housed in a bio-climatically designed structure, using solar power, efficient lighting and a new ventilation system with a bio-digester, which will turn food waste into gas for cooking.

The school’s pupils, aged from 5 to 17 years, will learn about the importance of a sustainable and healthy life-style and help educate the local community about the need to use the limited resources available more responsibly. Moreover, the project will teach the children about carbon-free alternatives and the project will help create employment and serve as a model for bio-climatic building design for homes and other schools in the region.

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GLOBAL HIGH SCHOOL - EUROPE

SCHÜLER-FORSCHUNGS-ZENTRUM SÜDWÜRTTEM-BERG

- Germany

Located in Germany, the first of the major industrialized countries to commit itself to obtaining all of its power needs from renewable sources, the Students’ Research Centre of Southern Wuerttemberg aims to enthuse, build interest and involve children and young people in the technologies of the future.

The students themselves are at the heart of the Centre’s programme as they implement their own ideas guided by experts. As a consequence, they develop a strong sense of commitment to their projects. Motivated trainers, serving as role models and radiating values, light a spark in their students allowing them to attain the highest levels of achievement.

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GLOBAL HIGH SCHOOL - OCEANIA

CASHMERE HIGH SCHOOL

- New Zealand

The Cashmere High School is looking to install solar panels, a wind turbine and piezoelectric tiles and conduct a campaign on sustainable energy best practice from which all secondary schools in the country will benefit.

In 2012 Cashmere High School installed smart “ecoDriver” meters and software to monitor the amount of electricity consumed at their school. Students launched a “Switch It Off!” campaign reducing the school’s electricity consumption by 10% in 2013. In 2014, the installation of energy-efficient LED lights throughout the school achieved a further 20% reduction.

Building on past achievements, the 25kW solar panel system will generate 36,250 kWh of electricity annually, reducing the school’s carbon emissions by five tonnes p.a. and saving US$30,000 over five years. The wind turbine will attract visitors to the school, generate 2kW and significant media publicity. Piezoelectric floor tiles will light a corridor and allow pupils to charge their mobile phones.

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Case study

Dikirani Thaulo

After winning the Zayed Future Energy Prize’s Global High Schools category in 2014, the Nkhata Bay School Authority used the US$100,000 award to set up the Zayed Solar Academy. It was here that Dikirani Thaulo, who is from a village outside Lilongwe in the Central Region, trained as an engineer and learnt how to provide homes in rural Malawi with access to electricity. With this knowledge he acquired at the academy he is now able to ensure that his generation will be the last to have to study by candlelight. When his training is completed, he hopes to help set up a Zayed Solar Academy near Lilongwe.

Dikirani’s journey with the prize continued when he appeared as a keynote speaker at the Sustainable Energy for All (SE4All) Forum at the UN HQ in New York. It was there that he symbolically lit a candle to represent the light he had studied under and told his audience that young people were not just the “next” generation waiting in the wings but were already shaping the future.

The Zayed Future Energy Prize has changed Dikirani’s life and the lives of millions of others. Dikirani’s story serves as an inspiration for the record 189 entries in the 2016 Global High Schools category.

Dikirani was raised in a remote village outside of Lilongwe in the Central Region of Malawi.

Dikirani left his home village to enroll in the Teacher Training Program at the Zayed Solar Academy in Nkhata Bay. He is the first student from outside of the Nkhata Bay area to be trained in this programme.

The Zayed Future Energy Prize invited Dikirani to address the 2nd UN Sustainable Energy for All Forum in the UN General Assembly Hall in New York. He explained how Global High Schools category had enabled life-changing work through Zayed Solar Academy.

Dikirani was asked to share his story at the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) conference during the international climate negotiations in Paris. More than 600 people, including public and media, heard how the Zayed Future Energy Prize was making a difference in Malawi.

When his teacher training is complete later in 2016, Dikirani will return to the Lilongwe area and establish a new Zayed Solar Academy there, if funding permits.

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Case study

Liter of light

Liter of Light started teaching people how to make homemade solar lanterns in the Philippines in 2011 and since winning the prize in 2015 it has extended its operations to communities as far away as Malaysia, Kenya and Colombia, lighting not only homes but public places too. Tens of thousands of households and shops in the Philippines benefit from these solar lanterns which save their owners US$10 a month on average in electricity bills and reduce carbon emissions at the same time.

Since winning the prize in 2015, Liter of Light has expanded its reach to over 15 countries in Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas, and now aims to light up one million lives with Liter of Light technology by 2017.

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Case study

M-KOPA Solar

M-KOPA Solar is a Kenyan company supplying solar energy appliances. Today, they sell 2,500 systems a week through a network of over 500 retailers. Within two years of its founding, M-KOPA had connected over 100,000 homes to affordable and clean solar power in a region where 20 million people live in communities with no access to grid electricity. Many of whom were previously dependent on expensive and unhealthy paraffin for lighting and cooking. The company has set an ambitious target to have one million homes using its equipment for heating, cooking, lighting, radios and charging telephones by the year 2018 and it is expanding its operations to neighbouring countries such as Uganda and Tanzania.

Felix Ogutu, a student from rural Kenya, and his family, have seen many benefits from signing up to M-KOPA’s ground-breaking scheme. The light that M-KOPA provides has ensured Felix does not have to study in the dark and that his family are able to fetch water for their home even when the night draws in. Felix now has round the clock access to the internet and has used this to participate in a bachelor’s course in IT developing apps.

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Case study

Ashok Gadgil

Dr. Ashok Gadgil, the Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, won the life-time achievement award in 2012 for his part in the development of the “Berkeley-Darfur” fuel efficient cooking stoves, bringing health, safety and environmental benefits.

Many people have to use inefficient rudimentary stoves burning biomass, damaging the health and the environment including the millions displaced by the conflict in Darfur. The Berkeley-Darfur stove is a metal construction and reduces the amount of firewood needed by more than half. A total of 45,000 units were distributed to women in refugee camps, who had previously had to walk seven hours a day, three to five times a week to gather fuel, running the risk of physical assault.

As well as over a quarter of million people having cleaner stoves, 100 million households are benefiting from efficient lighting in 30 developing countries and one million people have access to safe drinking water thanks to the pioneering work of Dr Gadgil and his team.

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Case study

ANGCHUK AND HIS WIFE DOLMA

Nomadic village head Angchuk, took part in the project pilot in 2013 whereby each home in his community received a Plug and Play Orb Energy manufactured solar system. In the first 12 months of the pilot, Angchuk reported that the effect of switching to solar had provided multiple benefits for the 15 families in the village, with dramatic improvements in terms of health. This included the complete eradication of the persistent chronic bronchial cough that each family suffered from as a result of inhaling kerosene smoke and fumes, as well as virtually unlimited light. The independent non-profit Alta Solar Project conducted the programme in remote villages in Ladakh, India with the aim of replacing polluting and health damaging kerosene lamps with solar lighting from Orb Energy.

Photo credit: Altar Solar Project - Orb Energy, India

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Case study

ANANDA MOHANTO AND HIS WIFE - IT STARTED WITH A PUMP!

Subsistence farmer, Ananda Mohanto from Kandasar, India, struggled to irrigate his field with clean water to protect his crops and support his family. His life and prospects were dramatically changed by the KB treadle pump made by International Development Enterprises India (IDEI), which provided an innovative and affordable solution to his problem. A US$336 loan secured a pump and he immediately began to reap the benefits with irrigation no longer an issue, and he and his wife were able to cultivate green beans and eggplants. This also yielded a steady profit from selling vegetables in the local market with which Ananda purchased a new kiln for the family. After repaying the loan, he was also able to purchase many essential items for his family, from schoolbooks for the children to a bicycle.

Without access to a clean and reliable water source, Ananda was unable to support his family. He felt hopeless.

Then, he discovered KB treadle pumps from IDEI.

An IDEI representative visited Ananda and explained to him how the pump operates.

Ananda was full of excitement on the day he received the pump. Was this the solution to his problems?

Finally, Ananda is able to irrigate his fields regularly. He and his wife can now cultivate green beans and eggplants, yielding healthy returns.

The pump has changed Ananda’s life. At last, he and his wife have hope again.

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Case study

ZAYED FUTURE ENERGY PRIZE SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAMME

The Zayed Future Energy Prize Scholarship programme was initiated by Dipal Barua in rural areas of Bangladesh.

Since 2009, more than 5,000 women have been trained as solar technicians. Farjana is one of these women and for her it has been a life-changing experience; her initial passion for the project was doubled when she embarked on the scholarship programme and has since become an advocate. Farjana is also using her newly acquired expertise to teach other villagers how to use the solar energy systems in their daily lives.

Another Zayed Future Energy Prize Scholarship recipient, Naznin, has similarly benefited from the experience which, she says, taught her practical skills and gave her the confidence and knowledge to cope with a wide range of situations, including dealing with customers. She also learned how to maximise the benefits of the system to make real and sustainable changes to the lives of rural communities. Today, Naznin is an active trainer in her local community school and is proud to be teaching other women to develop valuable new skills and improve their lives and economic prospects.

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Case study

THE ZAYED SOLAR ACADEMY

In Malawi, which is one of the least electrified countries in the world with less than 1% of the rural population connected to the national grid, 2014 Global High Schools category (Africa) winner the Nkhata Bay School Authority, which operates the Maula and Sanga Community Secondary Day Schools, launched its 2.5 hectare Zayed Solar Academy and Zayed Energy and Ecology Centre in July 2014.

The centres focus on training rural solar engineers, making solar equipment accessible to all, and demonstrating how solar lighting can save on household costs versus kerosene, which has severe human health and environmental pollution consequences.

Learning and multimedia resources for the two schools is also provided, including a library, an e-learning centre and science labs. In addition to the solar installation course, the centre delivers practical classes in bricklaying, carpentry and welding, using the ongoing construction of the centre as an opportunity to provide on-the-job training.

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Case study

FARM AND FIELD LABORATORY

The school’s interactive farm and field laboratory takes livestock waste and uses it to demonstrate the production of energy through the collection of methane, which, if allowed to escape into the atmosphere, is a major greenhouse gas polluter.

At Urrbrae, the methane is captured in a covered pond and burned off to produce heat energy and release less damaging CO2. This innovative project aims to show students what can be done to reduce greenhouse gas production in agriculture and lets them investigate and experiment to learn more about the process. It also attracts over 1,000 environmental visitors to the school each year that then take the information back home to apply it within their own communities. Engineering students from Adelaide University have trialled a complementary biogas production unit onsite and the country’s livestock industry is also monitoring Urrbrae to scale up versions that will hopefully be launched country-wide.

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Process:

Methane, which is released from livestock is 25 times more damaging than CO2. Urrbrae Agricultural High School in Australia generates energy through the following process:

Livestock waste and wash down water is collected...

... into a covered pond. Bacteria and fungi break down the waste material

The methane is captured and burned to generate energy

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2016 2009

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